Inquiry Project: Final Post

The reason that I chose to research Treaty Education for my inquiry project is because I feel such an emphasis placed in almost all of our education classes, however I felt very lost to how I could actually implement these philosophies in my classroom.

imagesI have researched a lot about why it is crucial we as young teachers need to be introducing this education into our classrooms. I have been very encouraged, but also have had moments of extreme discouragement as well. For example, I overheard a fellow pre-intern during our three week block explain how he was teaching a social studies unit to his class, and his cooperating teacher had told him to skip over the part of the Catholic church’s involvement in residential schools. Hearing that I was very shocked, however I was motivated again when my cooperating teacher would make a point of always referencing residential schools and the mistreatment of Ingenious people in Canada’s history.

I feel as if many teachers feel like they are teaching Treaty Education if they mention residential schools. That’s a step, however there are many other aspects to Aboriginal history than just that horrible part. I was enthusiastic to find that there are resources readily available for teachers to incorporate Treaty Education, such as my previous post about the amazing 100 Years of Loss curriculum I received from the Legacy of Hope Foundation. tupper-mosaic

I also appreciate fellow educators and their continued research about Treaty Education. Jennifer Tupper is the Associate Dean of  Faculty Development and Human Resources in the Faculty of Education, and she is doing amazing research about this topic that I will continue to follow and learn from.

I found this project to be challenging, but I am motivated to keep my research going and always implement Treaty Education into my classroom. As a teacher I am a life long learner, and will continue to feed my crave for more resources and information. images-1

Inquiry Project Post #6: 100 Years of Loss

Throughout my inquiry project, I have highlighted a lot of different reasons why Indigenous education is crucial to be taught in schools because of the serious implications of the past still being so prominent in our society today. However, I haven’t really highlighted how I have found to actually include this in the classroom. One thing that I really struggle with is actually implementing Treaty Education in the classroom. I am so excited about  a resource I have found that I will most definitely use in my future classroom, hopefully even as soon as internship in the fall.lgacy_logo-300x67

A friend told me about this website called Legacy of Hope Foundation, where you can request specific resources from the organization for teachers to use in the classroom. These resources are created with the purpose of educating and creating awareness about the legacy of residential school and the intergenerational impact it has had on First Nations, Inuit and Métis people. The organization also supports the ongoing healing process of Residential School Survivors.

I requested a 100 Years of LosIMG_0708s curriculum, with little hope that I would actually receive one because the organization survives on donations alone, and gives away these amazing resources for free, therefore it is in high demand and they are only able to give what they have at the moment. However a few weeks after requesting a resource, the curriculum was mailed to me, entirely for free!

IMG_0711 I cannot express how enthused I am with receiving this incredible resource. It is absolutely amazing. It comes in a very organized folder with an information booklet, a teacher’s guide video, and a teacher’s guide filled with information, lesson plans, and activates.

The information booklet is filled with information about the foundation, as well as a brief overview of what residIMG_0710ential schools were, the conditions, the healing and reconciliation that is trying to happen, as well as information about what we can do as educators and Canadian citizens.

The teacher’s guide is filled with more information about how to use the guide, dealing with tough situations and how to get through them,background information about Residential Schools, and then six very detailed lesson plans with complementary resources such as actives and information.

Finding this resource gives me hope because it shows that there are real steps being take-in the direction of young teachers like myself are being educated and given the right tools (sometimes, free of charge!) to incorporate Treaty Education.                                                                    IMG_0715IMG_0712       IMG_0713